A Wake Up Call

And now here we are. My class on New Orleans has ended, but the city still lives on. When first began my explorations of New Orleans, I was very interested in the mystique that surrounds the city, the myth of New Orleans. Now I’m not so sure what I’m more interested in. Over the last few weeks I have explored the reality of New Orleans in all its gritty detail, and I’ve come to realize that this view of the city is just as interesting as the mythical New Orleans. It’s so easy to get lots in the Mardi Gras celebrations, the voodoo, and the mysteries that New Orleans has to offer; the funny thing is, all of these things are part of the reality of New Orleans and not just the myth.

 As I’ve said many times before, New Orleans is one of the few places that exist in a state of surreal being. The realistic side of this being is just as prominent as the mythical side of things, especially in the ongoing aftermath of Hurricane Katrina. Sure myth may be interesting, but people are what is really important here, and the more I learn, the more I see that people in New Orleans are still suffering from the hurricane. They need help; the struggle to get this help is not an easy one. Even the culture of New Orleans has been impacted by Katrina and is considerably weaker than what used to exist in its place.

New Orleans is far from recovered – the city itself still needs something to bring it back to the way it used to be, not only for the city itself, but for its people. No people deserve to have their city wiped out and then ignored by the government. No other city in America has undergone this type of disaster and not received relief. No other city has what New Orleans has, at least in my opinion.

NOLA deserves better. People have been immersed in myth too long. We need to wake up and face the reality of the New Orleans nightmare. More than that, we need to make it right.

Drum circle in Congo Square

Drum circle in Congo Square

A 19th century view of Bayou St. John, New Orleans

A 19th century view of Bayou St. John, New Orleans

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Dr. John, a prominent member of the New Orleans jazz community

Dr. John, a prominent member of the New Orleans jazz community

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A house in the Lower Ninth Ward four years after Katrina

A house in the Lower Ninth Ward four years after Katrina

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legrandcirque:

Southern Pacific Transfer across the Mississippi River, New Orleans, 1920s.
Source: New Orleans Public Library website

legrandcirque:

Southern Pacific Transfer across the Mississippi River, New Orleans, 1920s.

Source: New Orleans Public Library website

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One view of the abandoned Six Flags New Orleans
I find the lack of care for the area quite fascinating, actually. The park is scheduled to be torn down (if it hasn’t been already) to make room for a new mall. From what I’ve heard, there was no real love for the park before Katrina hit (it was Six Flags’ least visited park), and the abandonment of the area seems to confirm this.  Perhaps this is because New Orleans has enough adventures to entertain people with besides a theme park, but who knows. A fair amount of urban exploration has taken place in the area since Katrina, and personally I’d love to get a look at the overgrown park before its gone.

One view of the abandoned Six Flags New Orleans

I find the lack of care for the area quite fascinating, actually. The park is scheduled to be torn down (if it hasn’t been already) to make room for a new mall. From what I’ve heard, there was no real love for the park before Katrina hit (it was Six Flags’ least visited park), and the abandonment of the area seems to confirm this.  Perhaps this is because New Orleans has enough adventures to entertain people with besides a theme park, but who knows. A fair amount of urban exploration has taken place in the area since Katrina, and personally I’d love to get a look at the overgrown park before its gone.

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bourbonandcanal:

Six Flags New Orleans

To go along with my previous post about the abandoned Six Flags New Orleans site, here’s a video taken in November 2010, five years after Katrina. These guys even climbed to the top of Megadeath to give a full view of the park. By the end it looks eerie, as if they were driving around on the set of a Scooby-Doo movie (those meddling kids!). Watch out if you don’t like shaky camera footage. Though technically trespassing, they captured the devastation wrought on the amusement park. Six Flags regards the park as a financial loss and is not willing to reinvest in it. 

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